Academic Profile

Academic Profile

Dr Loh Ming Hui Dylan

Assistant Professor, School of Social Sciences

Email: dylan@ntu.edu.sg
Dr Loh Ming Hui Dylan

Biography
Dylan M.H Loh received his PhD at Cambridge University at the Politics and International Studies Department. He was a Graduate Research Fellow at the Center of Rising Powers at Cambridge University from 2016 to 2018 and was a Pre-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Copenhagen, Department of Political Science, from September 2018 - February 2019. His research has appeared in Pacific Review, Journal of Chinese Political Science, Australian Journal of International Affairs, Journal of Current Chinese Affairs, International Relations of Asia-Pacific and International Studies Review. His research interests include Chinese foreign policy, ASEAN, diplomacy, practice theory and international political sociology.

Additionally, his commentaries and interviews have appeared in local and global media outlets such as Bloomberg, The Diplomat, Channel 8, The Straits Times, 93.8 Live, Today, 联合早报, Berita Harian, The Nation, Global Times, and the Voice of Russia among others.
Research Interests
Chinese Foreign Policy, ASEAN, norms in inter-governmental organizations; and inter-disciplinary approaches to International Relations with a particular focus on social theory.
Selected Publications
  • Dylan M.H Loh. (2019). The ‘Chinese Dream’ and the ‘Belt and Road Initiative’: narratives, practices, and sub-state actors. International Relations of Asia Pacific, .
  • Dylan M.H Loh. (2019). Institutional Habitus, State identity, and China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. International Studies Review, .
  • Dylan M.H Loh. (2018). Diplomatic Control, Foreign Policy, and Change under Xi Jinping: A Field-Theoretic Account. Journal of Current Chinese Affairs, 47(3), 111-145.
  • Dylan M.H Loh. (2018). The disturbance and endurance of norms in ASEAN: peaceful but stressful. Australian Journal of International Affairs, 72(5), 385-402.
  • Dylan Loh Ming Hui. (2016). ASEAN's norm adherence and its unintended consequences in HADR and SAR operations. The Pacific Review, 29(5), 549-572.

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