Research Categories

Materials Science & Engineering

NameResearch Interests
Asst Prof (Steve) Cuong Dang- OptoElectronic Devices - Nano-Photonics - LEDs, Lasers, Quantum Emitters - Nano-Materials
Assoc Prof Alfred Tok Iing Yoong1) Carbon-based Field-Effect Transistor Sensors The biosensors market, which is currently at USD 9.9 billion, is expected to reach USD 18.9 billion in 2019 (GIA Report, 2014) propelled by the growing population and health issues. Our group capitalizes on this emergent market and researches on disposable and low-cost sensor suitable for real-time sensing in field conditions. Our group focuses on sensors for biological and gas detection applications. 2) Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has evolved to be a unique tool for nanotechnology with atomic level control of the depositions, 3D conformity and homogeneity. Film depositions can be realized for complex non-planar topographies for a wide range of applications such as energy conversion and storage, nanoparticle catalysts, nanostructures for drug delivery, gas separations, sensing, and photonic applications. Our group focuses on ALD materials for solar cell, hydrogen generation and smart window applications. 3) Hard & Tough Materials for Ballistic Protection Application The next generation of military vehicular and soldier system requires light-weight materials with high strength-to-weight ratio. Our research focuses on the synthesis and densification of nanostructured materials & desired composite architecture to significantly raise the ballistic protection capability. The B-C-N-O group of compounds are potential candidates to form novel materials for ballistic protection application as they inherent the unique properties from both boron nitride and boron carbide which are known for their light weight, high hardness, low friction coefficient and high wear resistance. Prof Tok leads a team of collaborators in armour material research ranging from high temperature synthesis of novel superhard materials and consolidation by state-of-the-art Spark Plasma Sintering to advanced characterisation techniques such as depth of penetration test using Two-Stage Light-Gas Gun. 4) Institute for Sports Research Our group is involved in the Institute for Sports Research, working on the damping property of midsoles which is based on carbon nanotube (CNT). CNT’s high aspect ratios (length/diameter) is particularly desirable for mechanical reinforcement, and it is found that the vertical aligned (VA)CNTs perform well in damping, to dissipate the energy absorbed under compression (Figure 7). Our present job is to tune the damping property of VACNT by adjusting the length, diameter and area density etc. parameters and try to reinforce the polymer with VACNT to fabricate midsole material with better cushion property. 5) NRF-CREATE In accordance with the objectives of the Energy Thrust Program of the NRF-CREATE Project, our group is focused on the design and synthesis of highly functional nanomaterials, which enables energy harvesting and conservation. Recently, novel graphene oxide synthesized nanoballs and nanoflowers were synthesized. These exhibit potentials for supercapacitors and energy applications. In general, these activities results in above 50 publications, 17 patent applications and projects discussions with companies regarding commercialization possibilities.
Assoc Prof Ali MiserezStructural properties of biological materials from the macro-scale to the nano-scale Multi-scale structural and mechanical properties of biological materials, including biominerals. Elastomeric and structural properties of bioelastomers Protein chemistry of sclerotized hard-tissues from marine organisms, such as Cephalopod Single-molecular force spectroscopy of structural and elastic proteins Underwater adhesion mechanisms of adhesive proteins Biofouling RNA-sequencing and proteomics of extra-cellular biological materials Advanced Metal/Ceramic composites Experimental Fracture Mechanics
Assoc Prof Andrew Clive GrimsdaleProf Grimsdale?s areas of expertise are the synthesis of conjugated polymers for electronic applications, particularly light-emitting diodes, solar cells and thin-film transistors. His current research works focus on the synthesis of materials for solar cells and transistors and on the supramolecular assembly of organic materials.
Assoc Prof Ang Diing Shenp1. Reliability physics and characterization of nanoscale transistors (negative-bias temperature instability, hot-carrier effects, gate oxide breakdown, low frequency/RF noise, metal gate/high-kappa gate stack, non-volatile memories, silicon-on-insulator transistors, nanowire devices etc.) 2. Nano-characterization techniques (conductive atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and associated anaytical techniques for alternative gate dielectrics, nanowire devices etc.) 3. Characterization of novel devices (e.g. tunneling FETs, novel memories etc.)
Mr Ang Hock EngFracture Mechanics Analysis of Engineering Components using Boundary Element Methods. Instrumentation & Control of Fluid Power Systems.
Assoc Prof Aravind Babu DasariDr Dasari’s major research emphasis is on the development of in-depth understanding of the various facets of processing-structure-property relations in hybrid polymer nanocomposites to achieve synergistic properties for different end applications. These facets include: 1. Thermal stability and flame retardancy (with eco-benign agents) 2. Functional properties (electrical/thermal conductivities, biodegradability and UV shielding) 3. Electrospinning techniques 4. Wear/scratch damage at different scales (macro/micro/nano) 5. Deformation and Fracture mechanisms 6. Active food packaging
Prof Atsushi GotoPolymer Chemistry and Polymer Materials 1) Controlled syntheses of polymers 2) Development of new living radical polymerization via organic catalysis 3) Creation of new advance polymer materials using structurally controlled polymers
Prof Bo Gunnar LiedbergThe research interests of Prof. Bo Liedberg can be divided into three main areas Surface Chemistry and Self Assembled Monolayers This part of the research concerns fundamental studies of adsorbates and ultrathin molecular architectures, like Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs), on solid supports. The group was very early in studying self-assembly of substituted alkylthiols on gold substrates. A key activity has been to study temperature driven phenomena occurring in such assemblies as well as in adsorbed layers on top such SAMs. Oligo(ethylene glycol) and oligosaccharide SAMs have attracted considerable attention, both experimentally and theoretically, because of their structural characteristics and advantageous properties in contact with biofluids. Another area concerns interfacial water and ice. Temperature programmed studies have been undertaken to improve the understanding of the nucleation and microscopic wetting behavior of water/ice. The complexity of the SAMs has increased over the years and we are today focusing on architectures based on SAMs bearing multivalent chelator heads, helix-loop-helix polypeptides and receptor functions. Bioinspired and Biomimetic Nanoscience This research concerns the development of nanoscale architectures fabricated using either top-down or bottom-up protocols (or a combination of both). We are, for example, developing plasmonic arrays based on 100 nm gold nano dots on silicon and glass surface for amplification of optical fluorescence signals, so-called metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF). We are also developing composite materials based on a combination of de novo designed peptide scaffolds, planar surfaces and nanoparticles of controlled size and shape. A novel concept based on peptide folding has been used for controlled assembly of gold nanoparticles. The group is also involved in the development of Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN) for patterning of surfaces on the 30-100 nm length scale. This work is performed jointly with a previous student of the group who nowadays is setting up a nanolaboratory at the Institute of Physics, Vilnius. We are also involved in several EC projects where different types of micro- and nanoscale patterning tools are employed for production of coatings for biofouling, sensing and biomedical applications. Optical Biosensors, micro- and nanoarrays The group has a long experience in developing optical transducers for biosensing application. We were the first to demonstrate the use of surface plasmon resonance for studies of bioaffinity interactions at surfaces, a technology that today form the backbone in SPR/Biacore instruments developed for biospecific interaction analysis (BIA). We are today using it in combination with ellipsometric interrogation and imaging optics for microarraying, and in combination with nanoparticle for studies optical enhancement phenomena. This includes, for example, microarray chips for protein multiplexing. The group is also working on the development of generic biochips for studies of ligand-receptor binding. Besides working on microarray fabrication for protein detection and analysis we are also developing biochips for the safety and security area. Selected publications 1. Tinazli, A., Tang, J., Valiokas, R., Picuric, S., Lata, S., Piehler, J., Liedberg, B., Tampe, R., Chem. Eur. J. 11, 5249-5259 (2005). 2. Aili, D., Enander, K., Tai, F-I., Baltzer, L., Liedberg, B., Angew. Chem., 120, 5636-5638 (2008). 3. Aili, D., Enander, K., Baltzer, L., Liedberg, B., Nano Letters, 8, 2473-2478 (2008). 4. Andersson, O., Ulrich, C., Björefors, F., Liedberg, B., Sensors&Actuators B: Chemical, 134, 545-550 (2008). 5. Klenkar, G., Liedberg, B., Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 391, 1679-1688 (2008). 6. Aili, D., Selegård. R., Baltzer, L., Enander, K., Liedberg, Small, 5, 2445-2452 (2009). 7. Lee, H.-H., Ruzele, Z., Malysheva, L., Onipko, A., Gutes, A., Björefors, F., Valiokas, R., Liedberg, B., Langmuir, 25(24), 13959–71 (2009).
Assoc Prof Cesare SociOur research embraces several key areas of nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, including organic semiconductors and plasmonic materials, as well as new ideas on specialty optical fibers and “cognitive photonic networks”. We are particularly interested in fundamental properties of materials emerging from small dimensionality, large interface area, hybridization and artificial nanostructuring.